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Manx health Health Information

Pedigreed Manx cats today are much healthier and have fewer health issues related to their genetics than the Manx of years ago. This is due in part to the careful selection of breeding stock, and knowledgeable, dedicated breeders. Manx have been known to live into their mid- to high-teens and are no less healthy than other cat breeds. Like any other cat, keeping Manx cats indoors, neutering or spaying, and providing acceptable surfaces for the cat's normal scratching behavior are vital to lengthen the life of any cat.

Manx Syndrome is a colloquial name given to the condition which results when the mutant tailless gene responsible for shortening the cats' spine has an excessive negative effect. It can seriously damage the spinal cord and the nerves. The cat can have problems with spina bifida, bowels, bladder, and digestion as a result. Actual occurrences of this are rare in modern examples of the breed due to informed breeding practices. [1] Most pedigreed cats are not placed until four months of age to make sure that proper socialisation has occurred. This gives adequate time for any mutant gene-related health issues to be seen, as they turn up early in the cat's life.

According to Robinson's Genetics for Cat Breeders and Veterinarians, both the Manx tailless gene and the Scottish Fold fold-eared gene are potential lethal genes in utero if extreme tailless to tailless are mated or if extreme fold-eared to fold-eared are mated. Problems are most likely to occur when two completely tailless Manx are bred together. For this reason, responsible breeders generally breed a 'stumpy' or fully-tailed Manx with a 'rumpy' or 'rumpy riser' to minimise the chances of serious defects. This breeding practice is responsible for the decreasing occurrence of spinal problems in recent years.

no cat should be left outside as this can lead to arthritus,hypothermia,and accidents involving cars.

Because the Manx's has a dense coat, they will need regular grooming or matting may result. Also, the same genetic mutation that causes the Manx to have no tail can also cause severe neurological problems, as well as some problems with normal defecation. Make sure you have your Manx kitten examined at a young age, so any spinal problems can be detected.

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This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Manx".
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